You do not have to care for your pet with chemical based products such as flea and
tick prevention, shampoos, even some prescription drugs. Essential oils are not
just for humans. The proper essential oils, pure and organic, along with a good
reference guide, and hopefully some support from your vet, can open up a world of
natural living for your beloved furry companion as well.

Essential oils are not just for humans anymore. Just as NRF2 technology can be used
in canine, equine and felines to reduce the oxidative stress ridding the body of
free radicals, essential oils can finish the job with natural and safe products such
as flea and tick prevention, shampoos and other health support.

Unfortunately, just like medical doctors, not all veterinarians are as open-minded
to natural more holistic avenues of health care, but some are. You may have to talk
to a few different doctors to find one who you can work with. You can also just pick
up one of several excellent reference sources, published by a doctor of veterinary
medicine, which will help you determine how to treat naturally most any alignment
your pet has. One word of warning; DO NOT TRY TO DIAGNOSE on your own! Let the
professional diagnose the problem. If they won’t support homeopathic efforts, try
finding a good reference source that can help you, then proceed with caution, common
sense and monitor the animal until you are certain your treatment is working.

It’s also worth remembering that diffusing oils for an animal can impact emotions.
This is great for the little dogs who always seems anxious or nervous. Or the dog
who suffers from other emotional trauma, seperation anxiety, etc. Other treatments
that are good for dogs are those with forms of dermatitis or other skin and coat
conditions. Although NRF2 activator supplements take care of the inner cellular
health, essential oils pick up and care for the other areas.

For instance, I have a Chihuahua who suffers from a collapsing trachea. This is a
condition there is no cure for, there are only options to manage the condition. One
of those options is a daily dose of an anti-nausea medication. A daily regimen of
Copaiba, an all-natural essential oil, has replaced the $32 monthly expense of this
prescription and the results have been as good if not better than the prescription
chemical!

Our second Chihuahua suffers from IBD. He battles between constipation and diarrhea.
A diluted combination of lemon, peppermint and Di-Gize applied topically to his
belly twice a day is helping to improve his condition.

What is critical to understanding oils is to first understand the importance of pure
essential oils. When oils became the rage they are today, it started the creation
of poor quality, adulterated, contaminated and even synthetically created oils
flooding the market. These oils proved dangerous and the use of adulterated or
substandard oils should be avoided! You MUST use oils from a reputable company that
provides the consumer with the purest and safest oils available.

Some of the major oils that have the largest market of adulterated oils is Lavender,
Melaleuca Alternifolia (Tea Tree) and Eucalyptus. The market for adulterated oils is
large and encompasses most all oils since everyone wants to make a buck.
Unfortunately too many companies want the ole mighty dollar without concern for
safety or health. Find a company who can detail for the consumer the process from
seed to seal that is used to ensure the highest quality products.

Oils are extremely expensive to make. If you find that “bargain deal”, it is most
likely adulterated, if in no other way then being diluted with a carrier oil.
Either way, in the world of oils…you get what you pay for. A little goes a LONG
WAYS. Spend the money up front for high quality oils and they will last much longer
and provide a safe and happy experience.

I am not a trained animal husbandry professional. These opinions and recipes are
suggestions from my own experience or from suggestions I found and tried from the
Animal Desk Reference by Melissa SheltonScience Articles, DVM. Consult your own Veterinarian before
starting any treatment.

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